Supervised Release Revoked for 6 Individuals in District Court o - WBOY.com: Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

Supervised Release Revoked for 6 Individuals in District Court of Clarksburg

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Thirteen West Virginia individuals had their supervised release revoked in September, 2012 for violating terms and conditions imposed by the U.S. District Court, according to a news release from the office of the U.S. Attorney Northern District of W.Va.

Six of the 13 individuals had their supervised release revoked by Judge Irene M. Keeley in the U.S. District Court of Clarksburg, according to the news release.

Chasity Demidovich, 31 of Morgantown, was sentenced to 18 months in prison for violation her supervised release by being charged in state court for delivery of a controlled substance, officials said.

Demidovich was originally sentenced on May 13, 2008, to 57 months in prison and three years of supervised release for distribution of crack cocaine. Officials said on October, 28, 2011, Demidovich's sentence was reduced to 37 months in prison pursuant to the crack re-sentencing guidelines.

Demidovich was remanded to the custody of the U.S. Marshals pending designation to a Federal institution, according to the news release.

Carmen Johnston, 31 of Morgantown, was sentenced to 10 months in prison to be followed by 26 months of supervised release for committing another crime by attempting to defeat drug and alcohol screening tests and testing positive for the use of narcotics, officials said.

Johnston was originally sentenced on July 6, 2009, to 24 months in prison and three years of supervised release for the distribution of crack cocaine. Officials said Johnston was remanded to the custody of the U.S. Marshals pending designation to a Federal institution.

Stacy Marie Longwell, 25 of Four States, W.Va., was sentenced to 10 months in prison to be followed by 56 months of supervised release for testing positive for the use of narcotics and failing to report to the U.S. Probation office as directed, officials said.

Longwell was originally sentenced on October 30, 2009, to 36 months in prison and six years of supervised release for the distribution of crack cocaine within 1,000 feet of a protected location, according to the news release.

On August 15, 2011, Longwell's supervised release was revoked for testing positive for the use of cocaine and was sentenced to six months in prison and 66 months of supervised release.

Longwell was remanded to the custody of the U.S. Marshals pending designation to a Federal institution.

Joseph Wilson, 29 of Mannington, was sentenced to six months in prison for possession of a controlled substance, according to the news release.

Wilson was originally sentenced to 27 months in prison and three years of supervised release on June 18, 2008, for the possession of stolen firearms, officials said.

Wilson was remanded to the custody of the U.S. Marshal pending designation to a Federal institution.

Paul Casto, 49 of Clarksburg, was sentenced to four months in prison to be followed by 58 months of supervised release for testing positive for the use of narcotics and associating with persons engaging in criminal activity, according to the news release.

Officials said Casto was originally sentenced to 97 months in prison and six years of supervised release on October 6, 2006, for the distribution of crack cocaine within 1,000 feet of a protected location. Casto's sentence was reduced to 78 months in prison due to the crack re-sentencing guidelines.

Casto was remanded to the custody of the U.S. Marshals pending designation to a Federal institution.

Angela Marie Cain, 38 of Clarksburg, was sentenced to four months in prison to be followed by 68 months of supervised release for possession and use of hydrocodone, according to the news release.

Cain was originally sentenced to five months in prison and six years of supervised release on January 8, 2010, for the distribution of crack cocaine within 1,000 feet of a protected location, officials said.

Cain is free on bond and will self-report to the designated Federal institution.

The U.S. was represented at the Clarksburg revocation hearings by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Shawn A. Morgan and Zelda E. Wesley, according to the news release.