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WVU profs testing Einstein's theories

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MORGANTOWN (AP) -

A group of West Virginia University scientists are putting the father of modern physics to the test.

The Morgantown school says Albert Einstein's thoughts on the existence of gravitational waves may be proved correct by the scientists and collaborators. They hope to find those gravitational waves through observing a type of neutron star called a pulsar.

Funding for the 5-year project is coming from a more than $453,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The research will involve an all-sky survey of pulsars using the Green Bank Telescope in Green Bank, W.Va.

Assistant physics professor Maura McLaughin says direct detection of gravitational waves is 1 of the foremost goals of modern physics and may offer unique insights into galaxy formation and the early stages of the universe.

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