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WVU Students Create Unique Vehicles in the Human Powered Vehicle Club

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The idea of being "environmentally-friendly" is promoted on the WVU campus, and one club is making efforts to put this idea to practice. 

WVU's human powered vehicle club is in its second year, and hoping to spread the word about this kind of transportation. 

Kostas Sierros is an assistant professor at WVU. He started the club and now teaches courses that allow students hands-on experience working with these kinds of vehicles as well. 

"What we really had in mind was a short range vehicle that could use human power to move around with ease, so that it would be practical enough that people of any age and any background could really use," Sierros said. 

Mohammed Anbari is a senior at WVU studying mechanical engineering. He liked working on the vehicles "as soon as [he] walked into the class and started seeing the process." 

Anbari defined a human powered vehicle as, "any vehicle that's powered by human means, whether it travels by land, sea, or air, as long as a human being powers it, whether by it be the legs, arms, any limbs, as long as it's human-powered, it falls under the category."

It's a rewarding process for Anbari to take part in all aspects of creating the vehicle from the initial concept to actually putting it together. 

"I definitely enjoy the whole process of designing, and seeing the whole process come together. You see all that effort come together. It feels kind of special," Anbari said. 

Sierros said by creating the vehicle from start to finish, students are getting a great opportunity for real world experience.

Sierros also said the club welcomes anyone who's interested. 

"The aim of the club is to bring together enthusiasts of the community and they can mix with students," Sierros said. 

Members of the club are now working on a vehicle, known as a trike, or three-wheeled bicycle, to enter in a contest in April against other schools. 

Anbari said the trike is a useful form of transportation. 

"Because it's stable, there's no risk of flipping over on sharp turns, it might not be as fast as a two-wheeled vehicle, but it's definitely more reliable. It has a larger endurance," Anbari said. 

Sierros added that the competition is a great way for students "to improve on their old designs."