Senate right to ignore House gun bill - WBOY.com: Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

Senate right to ignore House gun bill

Posted: Updated:
  • OPINIONState Journal EditorialsMore>>

  • Wider lens necessary for effective education

    Wider lens necessary for effective education

    Friday, July 25 2014 6:00 AM EDT2014-07-25 10:00:24 GMT
    We say it often, but if West Virginia is going to reach its enormous potential, we will need a dynamic, robust educational system that challenges and prepares our people for the rigors of life in the 21st century.
    We say it often, but if West Virginia is going to reach its enormous potential, we will need a dynamic, robust educational system that challenges and prepares our people for the rigors of life in the 21st century.
  • Can we be realistic on roads?

    Can we be realistic on roads?

    Friday, July 18 2014 7:00 AM EDT2014-07-18 11:00:54 GMT
    Building and maintaining roads should not be a political issue. In fact, it should be pretty straightforward. Potholes need filled, drainage ditches need cleaned, the highways need striped — while it might be painstaking and expensive, the overall concept is pretty simple.
    Building and maintaining roads should not be a political issue. In fact, it should be pretty straightforward. Potholes need filled, drainage ditches need cleaned, the highways need striped — while it might be painstaking and expensive, the overall concept is pretty simple.
  • Looking the other way perpetuates criminal politics

    Looking the other way perpetuates criminal politics

    Friday, July 11 2014 10:46 AM EDT2014-07-11 14:46:55 GMT
    Former Mingo County Prosecutor Michael Sparks has been sentenced to 12 months in prison for his role in a political scheme that has dominated headlines for nearly a year and shined a bright light on one part of the state’s tangled web of public corruption.
    Former Mingo County Prosecutor Michael Sparks has been sentenced to 12 months in prison for his role in a political scheme that has dominated headlines for nearly a year and shined a bright light on one part of the state’s tangled web of public corruption.

Our State Senate made the right call by not taking a bill that would nullify gun ordinances in certain cities around the state. The House of Delegates, in an unbridled display of politics, passed a piece of legislation that had no chance of going anywhere and was clear, outright pandering.

Charleston's gun ordinance has nothing to do with "a well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed." It has everything to do with keeping guns out of the hands of criminals. Some two-bit thug coming into Charleston isn't worried about that glorious document that is the U.S. Constitution or defending himself and his family. This person is looking to get a gun, stick it in the face of a convenience store clerk and making off with as much money as possible. Or worse.

The dialogue concerning gun rights is a serious topic that requires forethought, intelligence and honesty. We must have this discussion and we must have it now, but our elected leaders should not cheapen the debate by endangering public safety.