Mannington Completes Flushing Fire Hydrants To Fix Contamination - WBOY.com: Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

Mannington Completes Flushing Fire Hydrants To Fix Contamination Problem

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MANNINGTON -

Update

Mannington has completed the flushing of area fire hydrants after a level of halo-acetic acid above the maximum allowed was detected in Mannington's water system, during the second and third quarters of 2012.

Street and maintenance crews began flushing fire hydrants last week to fix the issue.

Officials told residents at a city council meeting there was no reason to be concerned.

Crews used more than 100,000 gallons of water to flush the system.


Original Story

Mannington residents came out to City Council Monday night to voice concerns over water contamination.

Officials explained the issue to concerned residents.

Street and water crews began flushing hydrants in Mannington Tuesday morning.

"We got an HAA5 violation, which is a byproduct of when they treat the water with chlorine," said Terry Nice, Street and Maintenance Superintendent. "Once we got the violation, we had to notify the customers."

And they did.

"We were notified last week that there was a problem with our water that occurred," said Terry McLain, Concerned Resident.

A level of haloacetic acid above the maximum allowed was detected in Mannington's water system during the second and third quarters of 2012.

"Where 60 is the limit, ours ended up being 63 on the combined annual average," Nice said.

Officials said there is no need to panic.

"You'd have to drink a liter of water every day for 70 years to even have a chance at some of the risk factors," Nice said

Still, residents are left uneasy.

"My concern is I have a daughter that is pregnant with my first grandson. Obviously, I want him to be born healthy. From what I've read, this can cause problems with the development of the brain of the fetus or a young baby," McLain said.

Officials said flushing the fire hydrants will fix the problem.

"Employees work here, they drink the water, I drink the water," Nice said. "We are doing everything we can as soon as we can to correct the problem."

Officials said they will use more than 100,000 gallons of water to flush the system.

It will be taking place over the next few days and residents should avoid doing laundry during that time.