Abused Dogs Settled Into Loving Homes 1 Year Later - WBOY.com: Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

Abused Dogs Settled Into Loving Homes 1 Year Later

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MARION COUNTY -

Nearly 30 severely abused dogs were dumped on the side of the road near the Doddridge and Ritchie County line in June 2011. 

The Ritchie County Humane Society rescued the mix of pugs, dachshund, and shih-tzus and later moved the dogs into various groups and shelters around the area. Pet Helpers in Marion County found loving homes for ten of those dogs. 

Evidence of abuse and neglect was clear. The dogs suffered from mange and malnourishment.  

A year later, all 30 of the dogs are in loving homes where they are looking and feeling much better.

One of those dogs is Bonnie, a shih-tzu that lost nearly all of her hair.

"Of course there's Bonnie, who had almost no hair last year," said Terri Tichenor, volunteer with Pet Helpers.

Now in her forever home, Bonnie is Bonnie again. She grew back nearly all of her hair and is developing her personality; a personality that loves attention.

"Today, she wanted attention. If you were petting one of the other dogs, she would bark," Tichenor said.

But hers isn't the only success story. Apple, a chihuahua-pug mix, now lives in a home with three big brothers.

But her life didn't start out so happy.

"Apple. The first pictures I saw of her were some of the saddest I've seen. Her foster mom talks about how her eyes were just really sad," Tichenor said.

Apple doesn't take on to strangers quickly, but she trusted her new mommy almost instantly.

"She is funny, she is sweet. She's very loving. And she loves her mom," Tichenor said.

Sarah, a long-haired dachshund, found her happy home in Marion County.

"She is very happy. Her tail wags. Her mom came in today she just went crazy kissing her and hugging her. And that is a big change," Tichenor said.

Their hair grew back and they added some weight. But perhaps their biggest challenge is one that may only ever come with time.

"Really, the biggest thing that will probably never go away is their fear of people. They are always going to be a little slow to warm up to strangers. Some may never get over that," Tichenor said.