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Marshall prof to study rattlesnake species

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HUNTINGTON (AP) — A Marshall University biology professor is leading an Army study of the eastern diamondback rattlesnake.

Funded by an $87,800 grant, the research will take Jayme Waldron to the Marine Corps basic training site on Parris Island in South Carolina. She and other researchers will be study the impact of military activities on the snakes.

The eastern diamondback is under review for possible protection under the Endangered Species Act. The primary reason is loss of habitat.

Waldron said the military's goal is to ensure that its habitat management practices achieve their goals while protecting the eastern diamondback.

Waldron is an assistant professor at Marshall and has spent much of her career studying snakes.

 

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