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Pivotal changes necessary for the new year

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  • Local NewsMore>>

  • Extreme Sports Opens Its Doors In The Meadowbrook Mall

    Extreme Sports Opens Its Doors In The Meadowbrook Mall

    Friday, August 1 2014 11:44 PM EDT2014-08-02 03:44:28 GMT
    Extreme Sports opened its doors to the public Friday in the Meadowbrook Mall offering many unique sporting items.
    Extreme Sports opened its doors to the public Friday in the Meadowbrook Mall offering many unique sporting items.
  • State Police and WVU Give Students a Look at Crime Scene Investigations

    State Police and WVU Give Students a Look at Crime Scene Investigations

    Friday, August 1 2014 7:57 PM EDT2014-08-01 23:57:06 GMT
    The West Virginia State Police took it's mobile forensic center to the WVU campus for future crime scene investigators to check out.Middle school and high school students from all over went to the university to learn several different methods for crime scene investigating.
    The West Virginia State Police took it's mobile forensic center to the WVU campus for future crime scene investigators to check out.Middle school and high school students from all over went to the university to learn several different methods for crime scene investigating.
  • Mountaineer Mall Area Robotics Hosts First FRC Competition in West Virginia

    Mountaineer Mall Area Robotics Hosts First FRC Competition in West Virginia

    Friday, August 1 2014 7:56 PM EDT2014-08-01 23:56:21 GMT
    It was the first of it's kind. The state of West Virginia has never hosted a First Robotics Competition until now. Twenty four teams, from 13 states and 2 countries, competed for the top spot at the WVU Recreation Center."The practice matches we did were the first FRC matches ever done in West Virginia," said Autumn Baker, a Mountaineer Area RoboticS team member. "That feels really good that we can sort of pioneer this type of event."Mountaineer Area Robotics (MARS) put together the event tha...
    It was the first of it's kind. The state of West Virginia has never hosted a First Robotics Competition until now. Twenty four teams, from 13 states and 2 countries, competed for the top spot at the WVU Recreation Center."The practice matches we did were the first FRC matches ever done in West Virginia," said Autumn Baker, a Mountaineer Area RoboticS team member. "That feels really good that we can sort of pioneer this type of event."Mountaineer Area Robotics (MARS) put together the event tha...
  • OPINIONState Journal EditorialsMore>>

  • Successful privatization should inspire more reform

    Successful privatization should inspire more reform

    Friday, August 1 2014 1:48 PM EDT2014-08-01 17:48:52 GMT
    It’s not a stretch to say West Virginia once had the dubious distinction of having the worst workers’ compensation system in the nation.
    It’s not a stretch to say West Virginia once had the dubious distinction of having the worst workers’ compensation system in the nation.
  • Wider lens necessary for effective education

    Wider lens necessary for effective education

    Friday, July 25 2014 6:00 AM EDT2014-07-25 10:00:24 GMT
    We say it often, but if West Virginia is going to reach its enormous potential, we will need a dynamic, robust educational system that challenges and prepares our people for the rigors of life in the 21st century.
    We say it often, but if West Virginia is going to reach its enormous potential, we will need a dynamic, robust educational system that challenges and prepares our people for the rigors of life in the 21st century.
  • Can we be realistic on roads?

    Can we be realistic on roads?

    Friday, July 18 2014 7:00 AM EDT2014-07-18 11:00:54 GMT
    Building and maintaining roads should not be a political issue. In fact, it should be pretty straightforward. Potholes need filled, drainage ditches need cleaned, the highways need striped — while it might be painstaking and expensive, the overall concept is pretty simple.
    Building and maintaining roads should not be a political issue. In fact, it should be pretty straightforward. Potholes need filled, drainage ditches need cleaned, the highways need striped — while it might be painstaking and expensive, the overall concept is pretty simple.

The new year, 2014, is here. It's an election year, so it's unlikely we can expect too much from our elected leaders in Charleston over the coming months. 

That's unfortunate, because a cold, hard reality is going to be front and center this year and we're going to need some dedicated leadership to keep the state on solid financial footing. Reality of another kind may be setting in this year as well. For the first time in a very long time, this state might finally have a viable two-party system. Republicans have been asserting themselves and it's clear a once-devoted Democratic voting base is comfortable exploring new ideas.

Who can blame them? On a national level, the Democratic Party has been hijacked by the extreme left. Costly new entitlement programs, the Environmental Protection Agency's continual assault on the mining industry and the overall disconnect between Washington and West Virginia have left many with the feeling the Mountain State has been marginalized. Here at home, so many voters are losing patience with the majority party at the statehouse — a group that far too often puts the special interests above good governance and is not doing much to spur an economy that fails to produce sustained prosperity.

Some have described this pivot away from the Democratic Party in more substantial terms. Just this week, Chris Hansen, campaign manager for the U.S. Senate campaign of Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., told the New York Times that the upcoming political shift is like "a dam ready to break." We hope he's correct. Whatever side of the aisle you identify with, nothing motivates elected officials quite like the thought of competition.

For far too long, elected office has been seen as a birthright. The state has a pitiful history of political graft and corruption. Sadly, as we have seen in Mingo County, new chapters are being added to this book. Dismissive of the voters and the privilege that accompanies public trust, those who abuse their office clearly never felt much need to move the state forward. Hopefully, that is changing. Hopefully, we're on the cusp of a new day where those fortunate to receive our vote understand their obligations. This state does not need more of the same. we need new fresh ideas and elected officials at every level who look past the spoils of their post and see a West Virginia fighting to join the rest of the country. Quite simply, we need men and women who put our state first.