House members welcome back Delegate Anthony Barill - WBOY.com: Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

House members welcome back Delegate Anthony Barill among other business

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On March 3, members of the House of Delegates welcomed Delegate Anthony Barill, D-Monongalia, back to the House floor.

Barill was hospitalized following a gunshot would when the session first began in early January.

"I'd like to thank everyone for their prayers and cards," he said from the House floor. "I needed that so much. Thank you again."

Senate Bill 373, more commonly known as the "water bill," was read for the first time on the floor before being sent to the House Finance Committee.

House members adopted House Resolution 13, which would give the Mountain State more flexibility in how stringently the Environmental Protection Agency's carbon dioxide emissions regulations and standards are implemented.

Delegates urged passage of the bill due to the integral part the coal industry plays in West Virginia's economy and the jobs the coal industry generates.

Without the adoption of the resolution, legislators exhibited concern that those in the Mountain State would be unable to continue to benefit from reliable and inexpensive energy generated from coal-based plants. Many lawmakers also expressed concern that coal-related jobs would decrease, causing many to have to find employment elsewhere.

The House also passed House Bill 460, adding West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine to the list of institutions of higher education that are permitted to invest certain moneys with its foundation and establishing a cap on the amount of moneys that it may invest.

According to the language in the proposed bill "of the moneys authorized for investment, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine may have invested with its foundation not more than $25 million at any time."