GRANTSVILLE, W.Va. – State Representatives got together to tour the Minnie Hamilton Health System on Tuesday, with plans to renovate and expand the facility.

The tour showed the 62-year-old facility to state officials and the four phases of the proposed project improvements.

The Four Phases for improvements and upgrades are:

  • Phase 1 – New water and sewage utility improvements and replacement of the entire water systems. $3,741,721.00
  • Phase 2 – Construction rural health clinic, helipad, lab, administration offices, and hospital cafeteria. $7,906,925.00
  • Phase 3 – Expansion and relocation of materials management, laundry, rehabilitative services, and the pharmacy. $440,076.00
  • Phase 4 – Expansion of the emergency department. $2,675,920.00

“Projects like this not only means being able to provide healthcare services, but also the economic impact of the community as a whole, which is very important,” said Steve Whited, CEO of the Minnie Hamilton Health Care Center.

The facility plans to improve 10,072 square feet of current facilities, while building 18,519 square feet of brand new space.

“So we wanna try to do what we can to improve the service and quality of healthcare that’s provided here and they have some really exciting proposals to help with their infrastructure, to expand, and really deliver quality quality healthcare to rural West Virginia,” said Ryan Thorn, state director for USDA Rural Development.

Whenever a helicopter comes in to land at the current facility, the hospital has to move cars in the parking lot to clear space so the helicopter can land and take off safely.

Whited said, “The current helipad is not the most ideal location to land or to take patients out to put them in the helicopter, plus the inconvenience of having to move all those vehicles when the helicopter is coming in.”

The total costs for all renovations and upgrades will cost $16,564,192.00 and is covered by ARC, USDA Loans, ERHC Grants, CDS and NMTC.

The Minnie Hamilton Health System is the only Community Health Center and Critical Access Hospital in both Calhoun and Gilmer Counties that serves over 10,000 patients a year.

“We need to do things in a bigger way, not that we just put a Band-Aid on it, but that we really transform it into a first class, updated medical facility. If we are going to recruit good doctors and nurses to come here and we also want families to know they can come and live in this beautiful area of West Virginia and have great medical care,” said Gayle Manchin, Federal Co-Chair, Appalachian Regional Commission.

Minnie Hamilton Health System in Grantsville, W.Va. was named one of the top twenty Critical Access Hospitals for quality in the country in 2022.